advice

Develop new hobbies and skills to have fun and make money

By: Abby Holt

JULY 19, 2022

People are spending a lot more time at home these days, which, let’s face it, can be boring. You might be used to going out several days during the week or on weekends and are now racking your brain for ways to fill that empty time. So why not take up a new hobby or learn new skills? Doing so can bolster your emotional well-being as well as replace things you used to do outside your home. Today, Jeron Pierce has some tips to help you on your way. And who knows? Your new hobby might even turn into a business!

How Can You Learn New Skills?

In years past, if you wanted to learn how to play the piano, study a new language or fix cars, you went to someone’s house or a school for lessons. With today’s technology, you can learn all those things from the comfort of your own home:

 

  • YouTube has how-to videos for almost anything you can think of, from changing a tire to building a firepit in your backyard, and watching them is free.

  • Companies such as Udemy offer courses in many categories; you purchase the course, then access the pre-recorded lessons at your convenience.

  • You can take online classes on a variety of topics like astronomy, photography, entrepreneurship, martial arts, guitar-playing, and much more!

 

You can even study more advanced topics and earn a Nursing degree online. There are a wide variety of courses available, and online courses are flexible enough to fit into your busy schedule. With course materials available online 24/7, you’ll always be able to find time to study at home.

What New Hobbies Appeal to You?

You might know that you’d like to pick up a new hobby but have no idea what it should be. Women’s popular hobbies include sewing, knitting, jewelry making, gardening, painting, drawing, yoga, and baking. Men often enjoy beer brewing, grilling, guitar, carpentry, woodworking, home renovation, and car restoration.

 

Anyone may be interested in photography, graphic design, reading, writing, working out, playing games, doing crossword puzzles, and DIY projects.

Should You Formally Register Your New Business?

Credit Karma points out that you must report money that you make from hobbies to the IRS. However, you can claim business deductions if you formally turn your hobby into a business.

 

A limited liability company is a recommended business structure, but you’ll need to research how to start an LLC before proceeding. There are several ​​LLC advantages, including less paperwork, tax breaks, and protection from personal liability. Although lawyers can assist you in forming your LLC, attorney fees are expensive. You can save money by using online formation services.

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How Can Hobbies Make Money?

Typically Topical notes that you can convert many of the hobbies mentioned above into a home-based business. Brainstorm ideas to make money using your new hobbies or skills. Examples include:

 

Sell Your Hand-Crafted Items

 

Several online marketplaces specialize in selling handmade pieces, such as Etsy, Shopify, and Artfire. Many shoppers like supporting small businesses, and homemade items provide a personal touch.

 

You can also set up a booth at a craft fair or flea market and create a Facebook page for your new business. Share it with your friends and consider using paid Facebook advertising to reach more people.

 

Apply Your Knowledge

 

You can use newfound technical skills to create web pages. If you enjoy teaching, take advantage of virtual tutoring opportunities by selling courses or private lessons online. If you have just completed an accounting degree, consider forming a freelance bookkeeping business. Create and promote a paid webinar to share your skills and knowledge.

Are You Ready to Get Started?

Whether you intend to make money from newly learned skills or just want an escape from boredom, you will benefit from the experience. Choose something that interests you and enjoy!

 

USING MUSIC To
RECOVER LEARNING SKILLS

By: Anya Willis

JAN 4, 2022

How Artists Can Make Extra Money With Side Gigs

As an artist, it can take time before you can depend on your work for income. In order to ensure financial stability, finding ways to supplement your income is advisable. Side jobs are flexible, allowing you to work on your art while still making extra income.

So how can you earn as an artist without sacrificing your career? There are two ways a side gig can earn you a living: active income and passive income. Get the full picture with this guide.

Passive Side Gigs

Passive income refers to money that comes in at regular intervals without putting much effort into making it. To establish your revenue stream, you’ll need to work on the initial setup. Once everything is operational, you’ll be getting a monthly income without getting too involved. This can be in the form of online shops, investments, and many more.
On its own, passive income is not enough. However, you can establish several income channels that run concurrently.

Active Side Gigs

Active side gigs bring in more income but need more time commitment. The payment gets determined by the amount of work you put in. The right side gig should be flexible enough for you to set up your schedule.

Since passive income isn’t enough, and active income needs you to put in the work, the question becomes which one to choose! The answer is both. You are in charge of your schedule, so it's crucial to find a balance between the two. You'll need to identify revenue streams that align with the time you have and match your interests. Here are some side gigs you can pursue:

▪Blogging

 

Blogging can generate revenue both actively and passively. To make passive income, host ads and capitalize on traffic. There are different sites that pay based on your contributions. You get paid for each piece that you submit.

With good content, you'll also be able to direct traffic to your blog and manage SEO. Once you have adequate traffic, you can join a network that pays you to have ads on your site, such as Google’s display network.

▪Affiliate Sales

With an established blog, it’s possible to make additional income. Contact a brand that relates to your content and offer to the market and sell their products. Once you identify the online store of a particular brand, you can link it to your blog. You’ll have a special tracking link that allows you to monitor the number of sales you generate from your site. This way, you get paid a commission based on your sales.

▪Social Media Influencer

Social media platforms make it possible to reach multiple people simultaneously. As a musician, use your fan base to earn some income. With active social media handles, you have the chance to influence many people.

There are companies that offer to sponsor social media accounts with much traffic. You can choose to work with art-related companies. They'll provide you with complimentary products, and you’ll get paid for your influencing services.

Your Business

After establishing your side gig, the next step is to think of ways to turn it into a small business for reliable cash flow. You can manage the workload when starting, but you may need to hire employees as the business grows. Start by getting your employer identification number. As ZenBusiness details, this makes it easier to hire those employees, as well as legitimize your business further in the industry. You also enjoy added perks, protections, and even tax breaks.

The financial side of being an artist can have it’s fair share of ups and downs. To avoid letting those fluctuations affect your finances, it’s important to have other ways of generating income, and we hope the above tips will help.

For top-notch mixing, recording, and mastering, connect with Jay J today!

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USING MUSIC TO RECOVER LEARNING SKILLS

By: Maria Cannon

OCT 21, 2021

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Throughout the United States, schools have made cutbacks to music programs. Where music education once thrived, children are stuck with books and notebooks, rote learning, and the basics. There’s an increasing body of research indicating that music education enhances literacy skills, as well as other forms of learning.

When a music program is labeled superfluous and falls victim to budgetary cutbacks, science tells us that kids suffer in more ways than one. The loss of music education represents a particular loss to kids who stand to benefit most from improved literacy skills.

Learning about music and learning to play an instrument can help children focus and find a new passion for school. If it’s not being offered in the schools, many parents have had to take matters into their own hands and make time and space for music at home.

If you want to help your child tap into the myriad benefits of music, musician and recording engineer Jeron Pierce shares some much needed insight.

The Sound of Music and Words

A study published several years ago in the Frontiers in Neuroscience confirmed this assertion, revealing that students who took music lessons improved in their ability to process language. There are common elements in music and language, including pitch, timbre, and timing, which help students who struggle with language to distinguish nuances in speech. Consequently, their ability to recognize words, and repeat sounds that form words and sentences, is enhanced.

Children learn to identify words by pairing them with music. The songs we all listen to and sing early in life play an important role; they help us learn to verbally communicate by forming words along with melodies and rhythms. Songs that help us learn language become valuable sources of communication learning—heightening verbal awareness and mental acuity.

 

Students who go through music education programs tend to score higher on vocabulary and reading comprehension tests than children who are not exposed to music. Music education is also known to aid kids who struggle to learn math skills.

Practice Space

Parents can give their children’s practice time a boost by setting up a music room at home. Set aside a room in part of the house that’s away from most of the household traffic, and create storage for instruments and sheet music. Depending on your child’s instrument of choice, outfit the space with extra necessities like a pair of quality headphones, a mic, speakers, a music stand and anything else that can enhance their work.

Make the Time

Having a dedicated practice space will encourage your student to put in the time, but remember it will take months and years of practice to really develop the skill, and children may need motivation. Be sure to make note of improved playing, and try to endure the early years with a good attitude. One day you’ll look back and know it was all worth it.

 

Stick to a schedule and try positive reinforcement first. You don’t want practicing to become a chore. Consider private lessons in order to give structure and deadlines for weekly development. If that seems too costly, there are music education apps and online resources that can at least get them started.

 

Music should be considered a core component of a child’s education—not only for the value of learning to play an instrument, but for the many cognitive-learning benefits it confers on young people. Studies have shown that music education aids in the development of literacy skills, including vocabulary, word sequencing, and reading comprehension. It can also help students improve their classroom performance in mathematics. If you or your child are struggling with changing learning environments, try working music into the routine and reap the benefits.

Advice for creating an in-home multipurpose studio for performing arts

By: Maria Cannon

AUG 26, 2021

Jay J’s Studio is your source of inspiration and consultation for recording, mixing and mastering. Check us out today!

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Practicing performing arts is good for the body, mind, and soul. And the benefits don’t discriminate by age. If you and/or your child are into music, dancing, acting, or any other type of performing arts, you could practice however much and whenever you want by creating a space for it at home. While it requires a little time, energy, and money, putting together a multipurpose room/studio is a practical project to take on. Read these tips from Jay J’s Studio to learn how to begin!

Choosing the Right Location

Start by evaluating your home and figuring out the best place to put your multipurpose studio

  • If you have any rooms in your home that aren’t being used, that can be one of the easiest places to put your studio.

  • As long as you outfit it properly, your garage could be the perfect spot.

  • Like the garage, your basement or attic could serve as a great music room or dance studio.

  • As long as you have the right music or dance equipment, you can even set up in the living room! 

Getting the Space Ready

Once you've decided where to put your multipurpose studio, it's time to outfit it to meet your needs.

  • If your studio is in the basement or attic, it’s important to make sure it’s well-ventilated and insulated.

  • Hardwood, vinyl, rubber, carpet—the type of flooring you need will depend on what exactly you are using your studio for.

  • Use quality materials to boost the value of your home.

  • Also, soundproofing the walls is an option that you may want to consider.

Upkeeping the Space

And of course, you will need to work at maintaining your multipurpose studio once it's in use.

  • Find some nifty storage solutions and clean up after yourself each day.

  • Be sure to wipe down all high-touch surfaces regularly.

  • For your cleaning duties, consider making your own products at home; this will save you money and help to keep your household safe and healthy.

With a performing arts studio right in your home, it will be easy and convenient to practice what you’ve learned from your instructors at any time. Be sure to pick a good location, properly outfit the space, and prioritize maintaining it on a regular basis. In no time, you’ll be reeling in the benefits of having an in-home performing arts studio!

HOW MUSICIANS CAN MAKE MONEY IN THE covid-19 eRA

By: Charles Carpenter

MAY 11, 2021

HealingSounds.info

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If you're an independent musician who relied on income from live performances before the pandemic hit, then you might be scrambling for new ideas. Fortunately, you can still make money without giving up on your dream. However, you just might have to channel some of your creativity into developing new streams of revenue. Here are simple but effective tips for how you can create income as a musician during the pandemic.

Freelancing

Becoming a freelancer is one of the quickest ways to make a legitimate income as a musician, and it can also help you build your reputation in the industry. Depending on your skillset and preferred genres, you can get hired for songwriting, transposing, and mixing and mastering services, among many other services. Use job boards to start getting your name out there.

Live Streaming

 

Since in-person shows were put on hold, tons of artists have been pouring time and energy into building their live stream audience. And that’s because live streaming is the next best thing to an in-person show. So, acquire the tech you need and get creative with your presentation so that you can give your audience a meaningful, memorable performance. Furthermore, you can sell tickets to your live stream event or set up a virtual tip jar.

 

 

Teaching Lessons

 

There’s nothing new about professional music lessons, but more and more musicians are choosing to teach via video chat apps. Sure, it’s the only option for many teachers and students during a global pandemic. But even without the pandemic, it also happens to be more practical, convenient, and cost-effective than in-person lessons. Promote your availability on social media, and start building your list of students as soon as you can. Don’t worry if it feels a little awkward at first — you’ll catch your rhythm over time!

 

 

Getting on Streaming Platforms

 

Album sales are no longer a steady source of income for independent musicians, as streaming services have taken over. Nonetheless, you can still make money and gain exposure by putting your music on these services. Make sure you are taking advantage of all the major distribution platforms, such as Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon, and others.

 

Posting on YouTube

 

YouTube is another great platform for growing your brand and getting your music heard from people across the globe. Create as much high-quality video content as you can, and try to upload new content at least every few months. The key is to stay relevant and give your audience something fresh to look forward to.

 

Visual Media Licensing

 

Many independent artists get known by scoring a song placement on a commercial, TV show, or movie. Push to get your work placed on visual media so that you can earn performance royalties and licensing fees. While you shop the music you’ve already recorded, consider making tracks solely for placement.

 

Selling Directly to Fans

 

Using major platforms like the ones mentioned above can provide you with income and allow people around the world to discover you. However, you will make a lot more money by selling directly to your fans. Make sure your website is up-to-date, unique, and contains all of the music and content you want your audience to buy. And get creative with new merch options, whether it’s clothing, art, stickers, or any other types of products.

 

All hope is not lost if you’re an independent musician in the pandemic. Consider the pointers above for how you can generate a reliable income from your passion. Most importantly, remember to keep honing your craft and thinking outside the box. The effort you put in now could benefit your music career for years to come.

Enrich Your Life Learning A New Skill Online

By: Julie Morris

NOV. 2, 2018

Life & Career Coach

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Are you among the millions of Americans who watch TV after work? If so, stop that, as it's bad for your brain. Besides, there are so many other things you could do with your time, such as learning a new hobby. According to numberous studies, it would help you relieve some of that stress that you carry around with you day to day while improving your social skills and giving you invaluable self-confidence (which is helpful in addiction recovery). If you're not sure what to do, here ares some enjoyable activities you can dive into right now from the comfort of your own laptop.

Playing a Musical Instrument

Many people associate learning to play music with childhood, but you can actually learn no matter your age and reap all kinds of rewards from doing so. Becoming a musical master helps with stress relief, enriches social interactions, and improves reasoning and logic skills. The ukulele is an especially good choice for beginners. It's reputation for being easy to learn, it's small size, and the ease of access to online lessons make it user friendly for all age groups and skill levels!

Dog Training

This may be something you've left to the professionals, but if you're the proud owner of a pooch, it's time you took matters into your own hands. However, don't fret if your furry friend is no longer a pup: Older dogs can learn new tricks, and this keeps them fit and healthy.

Sewing

There's the clear practical benefit of being able to quickly and easily patch up a rip in your favorite shirt, but there's much more to it than that. As you progress, you may find yourself with the know-how necessary to express your creativity through making your own clothes. Even if you don't get that far, sewing helps develop greater hand-eye coordination that could serve in other aspects of your life while allowing you to enjoy the calming effect of the rhythmic movement of your hands, which is highly therapeutic.

Photography

Here's a skill that could net you a new cash flow while you explore the world outside your door and express your creativity in one go. You'll also be able to artfully document your journey through life while providing a helping hand to your loved ones at their weddings and other important events. Getting started can be expensive, with the right equipment costing thousands of dollars if you're committed to quality. However, once that's settled, you're just a few clicks away from learning the basics.

Dancing

Here's one that'll impress your friends, whether you're stepping seductively to a sultry salsa or moving your hips to a thumping hip-hop beat. Whatever style you choose, you're sure to burn off calories, as there's no dance around that doesn't force you to move your body, and you'll also get a much-needed mental break from the stresses of everyday life. All that can be yours if you can find a place to perch your laptop while you follow along to the step-by-step video instructions with your friends or on your own.

Yoga

Hardly known a few decades ago except among a handful of bohemian devotees, this ancient Indian art now has over 20 million practitioners in the United States alone, including countless celebrities. The question remains: Why hasn't the rest of the population joined in? After all, there are few other physical activities that strengthen the core and boost flexibility while also imparting a variety of mental health benefits, including stress relief. Tempted? Verywell Fit has a list of websites that'll help you learn the basics right at home.

With so many options available, it may be hard to settle on one. Give it some thought, and then get started. Soon, you'll be off on an exciting new journey that leads to good times and a sense of pride as your skills grow and grow.